Category Archives: Drivers

Expansion of Undergraduate Medical Education: Government Response to Consultation

Impact on library policy/practice: 

The impact on specific library services depends on how the additional places are allocated, and whether the organisation is already a teaching trust and has the infrastructure in place to support medical students.

Any increase in medical student numbers though will have an impact on library services that support medical students, and this could be in the form of demand for additional library stock, IT facilities, space, and pressure for 24/7 opening. Although not stated in the response, student expectations have risen over time, and universities will be keen to get good results on the National Student Survey (NSS). Since some of the questions on the NSS relate to libraries, this could be a good argument for sufficient funding to ensure student demands can be satisfied as far as possible.

Source: Department of Health

Link to main document

Publication format: PDF

Date of publication: August 2017

Summary of driver: There will be an additional 1,500 undergraduate training places at medical schools in England within the next few years.

Key features of driver:

  • The new places are for domestic students
  • There will be an increase of 500 places at existing medical schools for the 2018 academic year
  • A further 1,000 places will be allocated by a competitive bidding process for the 2019 academic year
  • The bidding process for the extra 1,000 places will prioritise widened participation and geographical area such as coastal and rural areas, and will support general practice and other shortage specialities
  • International students will be charged the full cost of their course from 2019

As well as the Government’s response, the document also includes some the results from the consultation divided into responses from individuals and responses from organisations.

Primary audience: HEE, higher education providers, undergraduate teams in NHS Trusts

Date last updated: September 2017

Due for review: September 2018

Group member responsible: JC

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Adult social care: quality matters

A Policy Briefing aimed at healthcare professionals is available for LKS staff to share in their own organisations. This has been produced and shared by the JET Library, Mid Cheshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. Please feel free to reproduce it (with acknowledgement to JET Library) for your own purposes.

Impact on library policy/practice: 

Library and Knowledge Services already make an important contribution to safe, high-quality care in the NHS. However, an absence of funding currently prevents library services extending their service and knowledge resources to most social care staff, and the number of providers in the social care sector make it difficult to negotiate service level agreements at a local level. This may change in areas where accountable care organisations are created, bringing health and social care together.

Commissioners of social care in local authorities could be approached to discuss the potential contribution of LKS to quality in the social care sector, and see if any SLAs can be created. This may be something that should be done at a national level, to avoid duplication of effort and ensure equitable funding and access.

Source: Department of Health and Care Quality Commission

Link to main document

Publication format: Webpage, with links to the main document and action plan

Date of publication: July 2017

Summary of driver:

The Quality Matters initiative is co-led by partners from across the adult social care sector, and this document sets out the agreed principles that support high-quality, person centred adult social care. The principles reflect those of the NHS National Quality Board.

There is no change to statutory responsibilities.

Key features of driver:

  • There are around 12,000 adult social-care providers in the UK
  • They provide care in around 25,000 different locations – excluding people’s homes
  • The sector contributes around £20bn to the economy
  • It enables families of people being cared for to continue working
  • It employs about 1.43m people doing 1.55m jobs
  • Challenges include:
    • Rising needs from an ageing population with increasingly complex conditions
    • Rising costs to providers of adult social care
    • Restricted public funds
    • Challenges in recruiting and retaining good-quality staff
  • Quality can vary – some is unacceptable and unreliable
  • Quality Matters is a shared commitment for everyone who uses works in and supports adult social care. It aims to achieve:
    • A shared understanding of what high-quality care is
    • More effective and aligned support for quality in adult social care
    • Improved quality in adult social care
  • Single, shared view of quality including:
    • Equity and equality
    • Person-centre care
  • Principles are:
    • Promoting quality through everything that we do
    • Coordinate action
  • Priorities to improve quality
    • Acting on feedback, concerns and compliments
    • Measuring, collecting and using data more effectively
    • Commissioning for better outcomes
    • Better support for improvement
    • Shared focus areas for improvement
    • Improving the profile of adult social care
  • Seven steps to improve quality:
    • Setting clear direction and priorities
    • Bringing clarity to quality
    • Measuring and publishing quality
    • Recognising and rewarding quality
    • Maintaining and safeguarding quality
    • Building capability
    • Staying ahead

Primary audience: Commissioners, managers and staff in the adult social care sector, users of adult social care, regulators and improvement agencies

Date last updated: September 2017

Due for review: September 2017

Group member responsible: JC

Drug strategy 2017

A Policy Briefing aimed at healthcare professionals is available for LKS staff to share in their own organisations. This has been produced and shared by the JET Library, Mid Cheshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. Please feel free to reproduce it (with acknowledgement to JET Library) for your own purposes.

Impact on library policy/practice: 

The strategy will progress with an eye on emerging evidence, to understand current challenge on a global scale. Library teams can help organisations to monitor the evidence, providing current awareness or horizon scanning services for emerging trends and innovative practice. Library services could provide evidence outlining global issues, or provide evidence for local initiatives and commissioning of services.

Source: Home Office

Link to main document

Publication format: PDF

Date of publication: July 2017

Summary of driver: The strategy aims to reduce illicit and other harmful drug use, and increase the rate of individuals recovering from their dependence. Integral to the strategy is partnership working to tackle drug misuse and the harm caused at local, national and international levels. The government will work with partners in education, health, safeguarding, criminal justice, housing and employment to provide a joined up approach to commissioning services which enable people to live free from drugs. The government will also work with global partners to restrict supply and lead global actions to prevent drugs harms.

Key features of driver:

Current situation:

  • Social and economic cost estimated at £10.7bn p.a.; £6bn linked to people stealing to buy drugs
  • 2015-16 ca. 2.7m people reported using illegal drugs
  • Fewer drug users are coming into treatment and reduced number of under 25s being treated for opiate addiction
  • More adults are leaving treatment successfully than in 2009-10, but wide variation between the best- and worst-performing local authorities
  • The number of deaths increased by 10.3% in 2015, deaths involving heroin more than doubled between 2012 and 2015

The strategy has four key themes:

  • Reducing demand for drugs –preventing the onset of drug use through targeting the most vulnerable members of society, e.g. young people, NEET, offenders, families, women at risk of violence/abuse, sex workers, homeless, veterans, older people.
  • Restricting the supply of drugs – working in partnership and changing approach to tackle changes in criminal activity. Using new technologies and innovative data collection methods.
  • Building recovery – providing treatments for the range of needs, adopting a joined up approach to commissioning services which enable individuals to lives a life free from drugs.
  • Global action – take a leading international role to adopt new evidence to prevent drug harms.

The approach will be grounded in the evidence base, monitoring global practice to inform the approach. The strategy was based on a recent evidence review published by Public Health England. Whilst the strategy is focused on drugs, there will be a joined up approach with action on alcohol.

Primary audience: Public health and Commissioners. Also those working in Education, Health, Safeguarding, Criminal justice, Housing and employment.

Date last updated: September 2017

Due for review: September 2018

Group member responsible: TP

 

Towards a smoke-free generation: tobacco control plan for England

A Policy Briefing aimed at healthcare professionals is available for LKS staff to share in their own organisations. This has been produced and shared by the JET Library, Mid Cheshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. Please feel free to reproduce it (with acknowledgement to JET Library) for your own purposes.

Impact on library policy/practice: 

With the emphasis on backing evidence based innovations to support people to stop smoking, there is a clear role for library and information professionals to support this national policy alongside their colleagues. For library services working with public health teams, there may be an opportunity to provide evidence summaries or horizon scanning services to support local non-smoking initiatives. For those working in trusts aiming to become smoke free, there may be opportunities to inform these initiatives.

Source: Department of Health

Link to main document

Publication format: PDF

Date of publication: July 2017

Summary of driver:

Since the last Tobacco Control plan, smoking has reduced to 15.5% of the population due to the introduction of a number of public health and legislative measures. However, despite having the lowest smoking levels since records began there are still a number of areas which need addressing.  This paper outlines a vision of creating a smokefree generation, with a shift in emphasis from action at the national level to focused, local action, supporting smokers, particularly in disadvantaged groups, to quit.

Key features of driver:

The paper outlines the current challenge:

  • Over 200 deaths a day are still caused by smoking
  • 8% of 15-year-olds still smoke
  • 10% of pregnant women still smoke
  • Smoking rates are three times as high among lower earners
  • Smoking accounts for about half the difference in life expectancy between the richest and the poorest
  • More than 40% of adults with a serious mental illness smoke

In order to address this challenge, the paper outlines four National Ambitions:

  1. Create the first smoke free generation by 2020 by reducing the prevalence of 15-year-olds smoking to 3%; reducing the prevalence of smoking among adults to 12% or less and reducing the inequality gap.
  1. A smoke free pregnancy for all, by reducing the prevalence of smoking in pregnancy to 6% or less by 2020.
  1. Parity of esteem for those with mental health conditions, improving data collection and making all mental-health inpatient services smoke-free by 2018.
  1. Backing evidence based innovations to support quitting by permitting innovative technologies that minimise the risk of harm and maximising the availability of safer alternatives to smoking

New plan aims to:

  • Ensure the effective operation of existing legislation
  • Support pregnant smokers as they try to give up
  • Provide access to training for all health professionals on how to help patients
  • Create a smoke-free NHS by 2020 for staff, visitors and workers
  • Promote links to stop-smoking services across the health system
  • Maintain high taxes on tobacco to make it less affordable

Primary audience: Public Health, NHS Foundation Trusts, CCGs, Local Authorities, GPs, AHPs

Date last updated: September 2017

Due for review: September 2018

Group member responsible: TP

Organising care at the NHS front line: who is responsible?

Policy Briefing aimed at healthcare professionals is available for LKS staff to share in their own organisations. This has been produced and shared by the JET Library, Mid Cheshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. Please feel free to reproduce it (with acknowledgement to JET Library) for your own purposes.

Impact on library policy/practice: 

The report concludes that clinical teams and managers need to have time and resources to improve patient care. This ought to include access to the evidence-base that libraries can provide, and time to read and apply it.

Libraries also have a key role in providing resources at the point of care, but as one of the essayists points out, even getting access to a computer on a ward is not easy, and passwords act as another barrier. Libraries need to ensure their resources are accessible as seamlessly as possible, and this could mean integrating them into the electronic patient record, or using IP or referrer URL authentication rather than relying solely on OpenAthens.

Source: King’s Fund

Link to main document

Publication format: Webpage of key points, with link to full PDF

Date of publication: May 2017

Summary of driver:

This report contains a number of essays looking at how acute care is currently provided, the pressures on it, and how it could be improved. It is intended to serve as a starting point for an ongoing appreciative inquiry into improving care processes in hospitals.

Key features of driver:

  • Acutely-ill patients make up a high proportion of the NHS’ inpatient work – this is usually unplanned and complex with ailments being difficult to diagnose. There are increasing numbers of these patients with increasingly complex needs
  • Information about these patients’ medical histories and test results isn’t always easily available
  • Consultants have problems communicating with GPs, other consultants and other hospitals
  • Using agency staff to fill vacancies has affected team-working and continuity of care
  • Changes in doctors’ training have affected continuity of care and led to a more fragmented and unsatisfactory experience for junior doctors
  • Hospitals’ solutions include: joining up different IT systems, using board rounds alongside ward rounds, improving handovers, understanding how patients experience care
  • Some Trusts have tried quality-improvement programmes but progress has been slow
  • Some Trusts have tried to standardise care on hospital wards including: specifying the composition of teams, interdisciplinary collaboration, early treatment of the deteriorating patient
  • The main responsibility for delivering safe and high-quality care rests with clinical teams
  • BUT Trust leaders should support them with the training, resources and time to improve care
  • Leaders should value and trust staff, giving them the ‘headroom’ to improve care and act on patients’ feedback.
  • Managers should make it easy for staff to speak up about problems affecting the safety and quality of care
  • Leaders at all levels should focus on the operational aspects of how work is done in hospitals
  • Action is urgently needed to improve the working lives of junior doctors
  • Regulators should provide the resources to modernise buildings, equipment and IT and to train and develop staff
  • Regulators should replace management consultants with a commitment to quality improvement led by trust leaders with a track record of delivering change
  • Professional societies should support quality-improvement work
  • The Government has a responsibility to provide enough money to keep up with rising patient demands

Primary audience: Hospital Trust management teams, clinical leaders, regulators and professional bodies

Date last updated: August 2017

Due for review: August 2017

Group member responsible: JC

Provision of community care: who, what, how much?

A Policy Briefing aimed at healthcare professionals is available for LKS staff to share in their own organisations. This has been produced and shared by the JET Library, Mid Cheshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. Please feel free to reproduce it (with acknowledgement to JET Library) for your own purposes.

Impact on library policy/practice: 

A large proportion (39%) of the contracts for community provision are held by private providers, with a further proportion held by charities. Library provision to these groups is likely to be difficult to arrange due to the effort required to prepare SLAs with each provider, with many of these providers holding just one contract.

Source: The Health Foundation

Link to main document

Publication format: PDF

Date of publication: May 2017

Summary of driver:

This paper analyses the community care contracts held by clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in England. NHS providers held more than half of the total annual value of contracts in the sample, while private providers held 5% of the total annual value, but 39% of the total number of contracts issued. Private providers tended to hold much smaller contracts, with 6 in 10 holding contracts with a combined value of less than £100,000. Additionally, most held just one contract.

Key features of driver:

  • Successive governments have wanted to increase the use of community care relative to acute care
  • BUT community care still only accounts for one in every 10 pounds spent by commissioners
  • Recently spending on community care delivered by non-NHS providers has increased substantially
  • BUT not many people know who are providing these contracts or what size they are
  • Investment in community provision is central to the Five year forward view, leading to 14 multispecialty community provider (MCP) vanguards testing new ways of delivering community care.
  • NHS providers hold over half (53%) of the total annual value of contracts awarded for community services
  • Other contracts are provided by:
    • GPs
    • Local Authorities
    • Charities
    • Private Companies
  • Of the contracts studied by the Health Foundation private providers held 39% by number but only 5% by value
  • Private providers tend to hold much smaller contracts – most held just one
  • The majority of very large contracts were held by the NHS

Primary audience: Commissioners, community healthcare providers

Date last updated: August 2017

Due for review: August 2018

Group member responsible: JC

Shining a light: the future of public libraries across the UK and Ireland

Impact on library policy/practice: NHS libraries are being encouraged to partner with local library services; this report will give NHS librarians an understanding of the current public library landscape.  Central to the report is the theme of wellbeing (see page 9) which may be a useful way for NHS libraries to open a conversation with their local public library colleagues.  The report also encourages partnership working and clearly there is an opportunity for NHS and local authority libraries to work together to work towards the five recommendations laid out in the report.

An accompanying data booklet summarises ‘how people in the UK and Ireland use public libraries and what they think of them’ which could be of use for business cases, impact reports or understanding how to target local services.

Source: Carnegie UK Trust

Link to main document

Publication format: PDF

Date of publication: April 2017

Summary of driver: This report outlines how public libraries can continue to contribute to government policy goals and improve people’s wellbeing for many years in the future. The report presents recommendations drawn from research conducted by Carnegie into library use and attitudes towards library across the UK and Ireland.

Public libraries have the ability to contribute to individual and community wellbeing and to many of the priorities of local and national government.  Moving forward, library services and their advocates need to be future focused and outward looking, and resist the temptation to embrace a backwards-looking ethos.

Key features of driver: This report seeks to contribute to the debate by sharing the ‘state of play’ for public libraries in the UK and Ireland revealed by our research.  The reports sets our five recommendations (‘lessons’) for how libraries can continue to improve people’s wellbeing both in today’s political, economic and social context and into the future.

These lessons are as follows:

  1. Demonstrate value to policy makers, decision makers and funders to maximise public and other investment
  2. Increase focus on tailored, personalised services whilst maintaining a focus on delivering a universal service
  3. Accelerate the development of a user-centred, data rich service with a strong online presence
  4. Invest in innovation, leadership and outcomes-based partnerships (one point is ‘Local and national governments and voluntary organisations to explore the value of partnering with public libraries to deliver services and outcomes’)
  5. Enhance learning between libraries and across jurisdictions

Primary audience: Members of the public and public library stakeholders.

Date last updated: August 2017

Due for review: August 2018

Group member responsible: VT