Welcome to the MAP Community

The MAP Community has moved to

http://www.lihnnhs.info/maptoolkit/

Please visit the new site for updates after 12th August 2019

This site will no-longer be maintained

 

MAP is a community to help frontline NHS library staff to demonstrate the impact of their services.  MAP keeps you informed about current NHS drivers, hot topics and policies and offers a forum to share good (and bad) ideas. Engaging in the MAP community supports you to be informed, inspired and innovative!

On MAP you will find the following resources which can be repurposed for dissemination in your own organisation or just used to expand your own personal knowledge!

  • Drivers for Change: Summaries of newly emerging health publications highlighting the implications for libraries
  • Hot Topics: Summaries of newly emerging health policy or topics
  • Templates to enable you to create an Ideas Capture or a MAP Stories case study
  • Evidence Summaries: What is the evidence in key health areas

Meet the MAP community

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Protected: Meeting 5th July 2019

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Designing integrated care systems (ICSs) in England: An overview on the arrangements needed to build strong health and care systems across the country

Impact on library policy/practice:

MAP has already looked at the implications of ICSs for LKS in a policy briefing on Integrated Care Organisations – a reminder of the impact below.

  • There may be an opportunity to deliver evidence and knowledge to managers, commissioners and transformation teams as health care services undergo this change.
  • As organisational boundaries blur and take a ‘whole population’ approach, LKS may be required to adapt their service delivery models accordingly.
  • If healthcare moves away from a competitive structure and towards a collaborative one, there will be many opportunities relating to knowledge management that could support the sharing and dissemination of good practice, innovation and organisational knowledge.
  • LKS will have to consider how the negotiation and procurement of resources needs to adapt to reflect the changes in organisational structures.
  • There is a clear role for technology in supporting the emergence of integrated care systems and Accountable Care Organisations that presents an opportunity for digitally enabled
  • Highly likely that LKS in sustainability and transformation partnerships (STPs) and the wider region are already working together in partnership and  can share experience of partnership working and collaboration
  • Fabulous opportunity to showcase our health literacy skills

Source:  NHS England

Link to main document

Publication format:  PDF

Date of publication: June 2019

Summary of driver:

The NHS Long-Term Plan set the ambition that every part of the country should be an integrated care system by 2021. It encourages all organisations in each health and care system to join forces, so they are better able to improve the health of their populations and offer well-coordinated efficient services to those who need them. This overview is for all the health and care leaders working to make that ambition a reality, whether in NHS acute or primary care, physical or mental health, local government or the voluntary sector. It sets out the different levels of management that make up an integrated care system, describing their core functions, the rationale behind them and how they will work together.

There are three important levels at which decisions are made:

  • Neighbourhoods (populations circa 30,000 to 50,000 people) – served by groups of GP practices working with NHS community services, social care and other providers to deliver more coordinated and proactive services, including through primary care networks.
  • Places (populations circa 250,000 to 500,000 people) – served by a set of health and care providers in a town or district, connecting primary care networks to broader services including those provided by local councils, community hospitals or voluntary organisations.
  • Systems (populations circa 1 million to 3 million people) – in which the whole area’s health and care partners in different sectors come together to set strategic direction and to develop economies of scale.

This overview recognises that each area is at a different stage of its journey and provides examples of best practice from all of these three levels. Regional and national support will be delivered by NHS England and NHS Improvement.

 

Interim NHS People Plan

What does this mean for libraries? 

Increasing use of technology and scientific innovation can transform care (p.5) and LKS can support this through current awareness services to alert staff to new developments, and through knowledge management to enable sharing of knowledge and best practice.

Libraries can provide access to evidence, for example through evidence searches, to evaluate and support the introduction of new technologies and ways of working, to help create a culture where digitally supported care is the norm (p.52).

There will be a need to help NHS staff gain new digital skills to help transform care pathways and clinical practice, and enable more efficient ways of working (p.5). While some areas are more difficult for LKS to provide training in (such as patient records) there may be areas that we can help with, such as helping staff become familiar with mobile devices and the use of apps.

Increases in student numbers as urgent workforce shortages such as in nursing are addressed (p.5) may require the introduction of new services to support them whilst on placement with NHS organisations, and may require LKS to work more in collaboration with university library services. Libraries support lifelong learning and continuing professional development of the whole workforce, and this will be key as technology changes and careers become more flexible (p.30) and will support the retention of staff.

The move toward Integrated Care Systems (ICSs) may have implications for the way library services are organised locally, and there may be a need to greater collaboration and partnership across a whole ICS. There will also be more partnership working between ICSs and local authorities that may lead to greater collaboration with public library services. It is expected that ICSs will become the main main organising unit for local health services by 2021 (p.55).

Source: NHS England

Link to main document

Date of publication: June 2019

Summary of driver:

The Interim NHS People Plan sets out the vision for 1.3 million people who work for the NHS to enable them to deliver the NHS Long Term Plan, with a focus on the immediate actions that need to be taken.

It argues that work will be much more multidisciplinary, people will have more flexible and less linear careers, and technology will enable people to work to their full potential. People want a better work/life balance.

The plan is organised around several themes:

  1. Making the NHS the best place to work

There is compelling evidence that the more engaged staff are, the more effective and productive they are. Staff report not having enough time, and sickness absence is higher than in the rest of the economy. The NHS needs to become an employer of excellence.

The report sets out actions to attract and retain staff.

  1. Improving our leadership culture

Leaders need to develop a positive, compassionate, inclusive and people-centred culture.

  1. Addressing urgent workforce shortages in nursing

Although there are shortages in lots of NHS professions, nursing is seen as the most urgent challenge.

  1. Delivering 21st century care

The NHS Long Term Plan sets our priorities such as increasing care in the community, redesigning and reducing pressure on emergency hospital services, more personalised care, digitally enabled primary and outpatient care and a focus on population health and reducing health inequalities.

This requires continued growth in the workforce and its transformation to one that is more flexible and adaptive, has a different skill mix and – through changes in ways of working – has more time to provide care.

The workforce needs to be ready to exploit the opportunities offered by technology and scientific innovation to transform care and release more time for care.

  1. A new operating model for workforce

Workforce activities need to happen at the optimal level – whether national, regional, system or organisational – with the expectation of an increasing role for integrated care systems (ICSs) as they develop.

The Plan starts to set out how the principle of subsidiarity will apply to people-related functions by setting out what functions can potentially be carried out at which levels.

  1. Immediate next steps

The Plan focuses on the urgent actions that need to be taken over the next year, and a full People Plan that cover five years is still being developed.

At the end of the Plan is a table detailing all of the proposed actions, who will do them, and the timescale.

National survey of local innovation and research needs of the NHS

What does this mean for libraries?

  • Libraries can actively look to disseminate information about national or local research and innovation projects to their users / organisation through current awareness services, literature searches or in specific focused events or activities to raise awareness.
  • This could be an opportunity to establish links with local research & development departments to establish which subject areas are of interest so current awareness services or bulletins addressing those topics can be provided; and raise awareness within the research and development team of the library’s ability to assist with literature searches, access to information databases, and searches for grey literature.
  • Libraries could host research coffee mornings or similar as meeting opportunities for researchers and those interested in innovation in their organisation to meet up and discuss potential projects, and lessons learned from failed projects.
  • Libraries could find out about their local regional Academic Health Science Network and disseminate to their organisation / service users information about what projects the research network is currently running.

Source: AHSN (Academic Health Science Network)

Link to main document

Date of publication: April 2019

Summary of driver:

This report summarises the national findings from a survey to identify local NHS innovation and research needs in England.

The views of local health stakeholders, including clinical leaders, managers and directors, within each AHSN (Academic Health Science Network) were sought.

There were some differences in regional priorities, but common themes emerged that reflected wider challenges facing the NHS and align with the NHS Long Term Plan.

These include a need for innovation and research addressing:

  • workforce challenges
  • delivering mental health services and providing care for patients with mental health needs
  • integrating services to provide effective care for patients with complex needs – including multi-morbidity and frailty.
  • research into the needs for specific patient groups – people with mental health conditions, older people and socially-isolated people.
  • using digital and artificial intelligence technology.

The survey also asked about respondents’ ability to access innovation and research in their region and confidence in implementing it.

The survey identified where research existed in the respondents’ priority areas, using it and implementing the research were identified as potential problems.

Improvements in communication and dissemination of information were identified as improvements needed to raise awareness of research and innovation; whilst sharing knowledge was identified as important for improving the application of innovation and research.

NHS Constitution

What does this mean for libraries?

  1. Library & Knowledge Services are clearly aligned with principle 3: “The NHS aspires to the highest standards of excellence and professionalism” as we continue to train and support staff to deliver high-quality, evidence-based healthcare.  Identifying and appraising evidence to inform service development means that good practice and learning are incorporated into the planning and delivery of NHS services. LKS are committed to developing people; we support academic endeavours, enable NHS staff to employ effective knowledge management behaviours and promote critical thinking.  LKS work closely with research practitioners and departments to assess and grow the evidence base to improve health care for the future.
  2. That the NHS is patient-centric is a key theme of the Constitution.  There are opportunities for LKS to ensure patient information is communicated plainly, accurately and in an accessible way, whether through supporting the development of patient information leaflets, or helping healthcare staff to translate evidence in a meaningful way.
  3. LKS professionals are skilled in building relationships, harnessing technology and networking to enable effective knowledge transfer across healthcare systems. This expertise clearly supports principle 5: “The NHS works across organisational boundaries and in partnership with other organisations in the interest of patients, local communities and the wider population”.
  4. Ensuring that effective, evidence based decision-making is employed across the NHS is crucial to achieving principle 6: “The NHS is committed to providing best value for taxpayers’ money and the most effective, fair and sustainable use of finite resources”. LKS can accelerate effective decision-making by harnessing evidence, learning and knowledge for health care systems to apply.
  5. The values of equity, openness and partnership working described in the Constitution are echoed in the principles that underpin the delivery of Library and Knowledge Services, as outlined in Knowledge for Healthcare.

Source: Department of Health and Social Care

Link to main document

Date of publication: Published March 2012, updated October 2015

Summary of driver:

The NHS Constitution establishes the principles and values of the NHS in England.

Seven key principles guide the NHS in all it does:

  1. The NHS provides a comprehensive service, available to all
  2. Access to NHS services is based on clinical need, not an individual’s ability to pay.
  3. The NHS aspires to the highest standards of excellence and professionalism
  4. NHS services must reflect the needs and preferences of patients, their families and their carers.
  5. The NHS works across organisational boundaries and in partnership with other organisations in the interest of patients, local communities and the wider population
  6. The NHS is committed to providing best value for taxpayers’ money and the most effective, fair and sustainable use of finite resources
  7. The NHS is accountable to the public, communities and patients that it serves.

Protected: Meeting 1st April 2019

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GP Partnership Review: Final Report

Optional wording for policy briefings ONLY: A policy briefing is available for LKS staff to share in their organisations.  Produced by the JET Library at Mid Cheshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.  Feel free to reproduce it (with acknowledgement).

What does this mean for libraries? This report outlines the challenges that GPs are facing with increasing workloads and the rising complexity of patients resulting in clinical risk challenges.

  • LKS could support GP partnerships with the evidence base and current awareness services to support complex care.
  • LKS could approach local CCGs / GPs to make them aware of the services available or see if they wish to take up the offer where provision doesn’t exist.
  • Libraries serving GPs or organisations in partnership with GPs may wish to review resources and collections to offer leadership resources for staff looking to develop leadership skills.

Source: Department of Health and Social Care

Link to main document https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/gp-partnership-review-final-report

Date of publication: January 2019

Summary of driver: This review considers the challenges that currently face GP partnerships and makes the following recommendations to revitalise and transform the partnership model:

  • There are significant opportunities that should be taken forward to reduce the personal risk and unlimited liability currently associated with GP partnerships.
  • The number of General Practitioners who work in practices, and in roles that support the delivery of direct patient care, should be increased and funded.
  • The capacity and range of healthcare professionals available to support patients in the community should be increased, through services embedded in partnership with general practice.
  • Medical training should be refocused to increase the time spent in general practice, to develop a better understanding of the strengths and opportunities of primary care partnerships and how they fit into the wider health system.
  • Primary Care Networks should be established and operate in a way that makes constituent practices more sustainable and enables partners to address workload and safe working capacity, while continuing to support continuity of high quality, personalised, holistic care.
  • General practice must have a strong, consistent and fully representative voice at system level.
  • There are opportunities that should be taken to enable practices to use resources more efficiently by ensuring access to both essential IT equipment and innovative digital services.