Welcome to the MAP Community

MAP is a community to help frontline NHS library staff to demonstrate the impact of their services.  MAP keeps you informed about current NHS drivers, hot topics and policies and offers a forum to share good (and bad) ideas. Engaging in the MAP community supports you to be informed, inspired and innovative!

On MAP you will find the following resources which can be repurposed for dissemination in your own organisation or just used to expand your own personal knowledge!

  • Drivers for Change: Summaries of newly emerging health publications highlighting the implications for libraries
  • Hot Topics: Summaries of newly emerging health policy or topics
  • Templates to enable you to create an Ideas Capture or a MAP Stories case study
  • Evidence Summaries: What is the evidence in key health areas

Meet the MAP community

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Learning from deaths Guidance for NHS trusts on working with bereaved families and carers

What does this mean for libraries?

Library and knowledge services can support staff and members of the public by signposting  to the various reports that informed this document. LKS staff could work with other LKS sectors to signpost to local and national support for bereaved families and carers.

Source: NHS England on behalf of the National Quality Board (NQB).

Link to main document

Date of publication: July 2018 

Summary of driver:

The NHS is committed to creating a learning culture and using patient and public experience to drive improvements. The CQC’s report ‘Learning, Candour and Accountability’ concluded that the way trusts engage with families required significant improvement.

Personal insights and experiences have shaped the guidance and will benefit all those involved following a death. In particular, supporting staff and families after an unexpected, avoidable or traumatic death in NHS care. It has the potential to break down the ‘them and us’ culture that families and carers have experienced.

It is about improving communication and engagement with families and how the NHS learns from its mistakes. It consolidates existing guidance and provides a perspective from family members, who have experienced bereavement within the NHS.

It will help trusts and commissioners to identify where they can make improvements in how they engage with families and carers. It is also a source of information for families and carers so they know what to expect following the loss of their loved one while in a trust’s care.

This information should supplement organisations own information and resources for bereavement support for families and carers.

Guidance breakdown:

  • Guiding principles
  • Family involvement before a death
  • Immediate actions following a death
  • Case note reviews
  • Information and participation in an investigation
  • Access to independent advice, information and advocacy
  • Family and carer participation in trust training
  • Involving families in action planning an assurance processes
  • Action if a family is dissatisfied with an investigation or their involvement

Gosport War Memorial Hospital: The Report of the Gosport Independent Panel

policy briefing is available for LKS staff to share in their organisations.  Produced by the JET Library at Mid Cheshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.  Feel free to reproduce it (with acknowledgement).

What does this mean for libraries? 

Whilst this report has no direct impact on LKS, this is an important document to be aware of and to circulate within organisations.

Source: The Gosport Independent Panel

Link to main document 

Date of publication: June 2018

Summary of driver:

This Report is an in-depth analysis of the Gosport Independent Panel’s findings into the concerns raised by families over a number of years about the initial care of their relatives in Gosport War Memorial Hospital.

How is the NHS performing? June 2018

A policy briefing is available for LKS staff to share in their organisations.  Produced by the JET Library at Mid Cheshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.  Feel free to reproduce it (with acknowledgement).

What does this mean for libraries? With services under great pressure, there is a greater need for library and knowledge services to support effective and efficient healthcare. As well as making health care provision safer, K4H impact case studies demonstrate that LKS can help make cost savings, and can support health service transformation.

Source: King’s Fund

Link to main document

Date of publication: July 2018

Summary of driver:

This is the 26th quarterly report by the King’s Fund, and as well as looking back at what has happened over the past three months, considers the recently announced funding offer for the NHS.

  • Services remain under substantial pressure – there are 4.2m waiting for consultant-led care
  • There is little optimism that current A&E performance targets can be met
  • Some NHS organisations are spiralling further into deficit while others are seeing their surpluses bolstered by centrally-released funding
  • There are some positive signs of increased joint working between local providers and commissioners of care
  • The recent announcement of a five-year funding offer for the NHS provides an opportunity to make good on previous attempts to deliver out-of-hospital services, including social care
  • By March 2018 2,755 people had been waiting more than a year for treatment – the highest number since 2012/13
  • The time by which 92% of patients are seen after a referral is now 22 weeks; the highest since March 2009
  • GP referrals are growing at a slower rate than before but are still increasing
  • Hospital-bed occupancy is at its highest level for eight years
  • Emergency admissions in May 2018 were 5.6% higher than the year before
  • 44% of CCG finance leads are considering extending waiting lists or reducing activity for certain elective specialties
  • In March 2018 only 9 of 137 Trusts with major A&E departments me the 95% standard
  • The overall 95% standard has not been achieved since July 2015
  • By the end of the 2017/18 financial year the provider sector had a deficit of £960m
  • The commissioning sector had an underspend of £955m due to underspending in central NHS England budgets
  • Nearly two-fifths of CCGs are expecting to overspend their budgets next year
  • 80% of CCGs are considering extending the number of low-value treatments and prescriptions that will no longer be funded
  • 42% of Trust finance directors are expecting to end 2018/19 in deficit
  • 51% of finance directors and 21% of CCG finance leads feel patient care has worsened in their area over the past year
  • However, closer working through STPs and ICSs is starting to pay some dividends
  • Acute Trusts account for 87% of Trusts in deficit
  • The long-term NHS funding settlement, a Green Paper on social-care reform and a 10-year health and care workforce strategy – taken together – might provide the best opportunity in a decade for health and social-care services to both find some stability and use that stability as a base for more fundamental transformation and improvement.

Protected: Meeting 3rd August 2018 2-3pm

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Leadership in today’s NHS: delivering the impossible

policy briefing is available for LKS staff to share in their organisations.  Produced by the JET Library at Mid Cheshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.  Feel free to reproduce it (with acknowledgement).

What does this mean for libraries? 

Opportunity to support the increasing demand for knowledge resources related to sustainable leadership.

Source: King’s Fund

Link to main document 

Date of publication: July 2018

Summary of driver:

This report is based on a survey of NHS trusts and foundation trusts carried out by NHS Providers in 2017. Consisting of qualitative interviews and a roundtable event with frontline leaders and national stakeholders, the survey showed that leadership vacancies are widespread and that a culture of blaming individuals for failure is making leadership roles less attractive. The report also highlights the widespread challenges in meeting financial and performance targets as demands on services continue to increase. The challenges facing leaders of NHS trusts have changed and there is now a greater emphasis placed on working collaboratively as part of more integrated health and care systems.

 

Protected: Meeting 17th July 2018 11am-12pm

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The NHS 10-year plan: how should the extra funding be spent?

A policy briefing is available for LKS staff to share in their organisations.  Produced by the JET Library at Mid Cheshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.  Feel free to reproduce it (with acknowledgement).

What does this mean for libraries?

Whilst only suggestions from the King’s Fund, some of the points made are aims that have been stated before, and if implemented would have implications for LKS.

The integration of health and social care may mean new groups of staff to support, especially around social care staff who have not traditionally been served by NHS libraries. Whilst it make take many years to fully integrate health and social care, in some areas, the introduction of Integrated Care Organisations and Accountable Care Organisations may mean this happens much faster.

The suggested expansion of new roles such as physician and nurse associates may mean more staff undertaking courses whilst working, and nurse associates in particular may need more support for their learning locally. A re-balancing of staff towards primary and community care has implications for the way LKS support remote users that may find it difficult to access LKS in person.

The King’s Fund suggests more capacity among local leaders and less reliance on external regulators. LKS already support leadership education and development, but this may become more important in the future.

Various ways of tackling waste are mentioned, such as reducing the use of procedures of limited value, and tackling variations in practice. LKS are ideally placed to ensure that the evidence base of healthcare is used to provide consistent and effective care.

Source: King’s Fund

Link to main document

Date of publication: July 2018

Summary of driver:

The King’s Fund has outlined the priorities it believes should be at the heart of the NHS plan that the Government has asked the NHS to create, to show how it will use the extra funding it recently announced will be spent.

  • The centrepiece of the new plan should be a commitment to bring about measurable improvements in population health and to reduce health inequalities
  • This depends on making further progress in integrating health and social care
  • There should be a focus on: older people with frailty, people with complex needs and children
  • Reforming the NHS from within needs much more emphasis, drawing on the intrinsic motivation of staff. This depends on building capability among leaders and staff as less reliance is placed on external interventions from regulators
  • The Government must increase funding for the social care and public-health services provided and commissioned by local authorities
  • The NHS and Government must work together to produce a comprehensive workforce plan and bring forward proposals to make social-care funding sustainable
  • The Government’s new funding translates to an average annual increase of 3.4%
  • Productivity in the NHS has grown by around 1.4% a year since 2009 and the Government wants this kept up for the next five years
  • The OECD estimates that about a fifth of spending on health care makes no or minimal contribution to health outcomes this includes:
    • Adverse events
    • People who are in hospital because no appropriate alternatives are available
    • Administrative costs
  • Ways of tackling waste include:
    • More generic prescribing
    • Tackling variations in practice
    • Reducing overuse of antibiotics and procedures of limited value
    • Reducing the transaction costs of the internal market
    • Reducing the number of national bodes
    • Reduce over-reliance on inspection and regulation
  • There should be more use of social prescribing for things such as volunteering, arts activities, cookery, gardening etc
  • Alternative solutions to those offered by the public sector are needed – these could come from charities
  • The aim should be to work towards a single health and social-care system – a move to free personal care would cost an additional £14bn by 2030/31
  • There is a need to train, retain and retrain staff
  • Physician and nursing associate roles should be expanded and more use made of apprentices
  • The workforce should be re-balanced to more primary and community staff
  • Integrated care systems (ICSs) should be established in law as NHS bodies held to account on goals for improving population health
  • Peer-to-peer connections should be enabled through learning networks, improvement collaboratives and communities of practice