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Welcome to the MAP Toolkit

Meet the Steering Group

Read what other people have to say about the MAP Toolkit
Toolkit in action! 

  • Can you identify the key drivers for change that are influencing your NHS organisation and its decision-making?
  • Do you want to demonstrate how your library service is aligned to the priorities of the NHS?
  • Do you need help critically highlighting how your library adds value and impacts upon organisational change, policy and practice?

Then this toolkit is for you!

Find out more about the Toolkit and how you can use it to demonstrate impact!

Mind the Gap: Exploring the Needs of Early Career Nurses and Midwives in the Workplace

Source: Summary report from Birmingham and Solihull LETC Every Student Counts Project. Published by Health Education England.

Link to main document

Publication format: PDF

Date of publication: May 2015

Summary of driver: This is the report of a project looking at recruitment and retention of early career nurses and midwives (currently consisting of Generation Y). Research was conducted among final year students and newly qualified staff showing that early career nurses and midwives wanted, among other things, clear progression pathways, care and support from team leaders, spiritedness, meaningful work, developmental support and flexibility to achieve work-life balance.

It also looks at the differing needs of four different ‘generations’ of nurses and midwives (Baby Boomers, Generation X, Generation Y and Generation Z) in terms of support required for their career, and also the differing values, expectation and motivations of each generation. Generation Z are those just entering higher education now, born after 1995, so will be entering the workforce shortly.

Key features of driver:

  • Overviews of the characteristics of each generation as infographics
  • More detailed information about the workplace needs of Generation Y (born 1980 – 1994) who make up 35% of the NHS workforce

Primary audience: Health Education England, employers and education providers

Impact on library policy/practice:

It’s difficult to pinpoint specific implications for library services, as the report is focused on the work environment, and the generational cohort descriptions are very stereotyped. It may be that characteristics shaped by differing learning styles may have a bigger impact for us.

Date last updated: August 2016

Due for review: August 2017

Group member responsible: JC

Focus on: Public Health and Prevention: Has the Quality of Services Changed Over Recent Years?

Source: QualityWatch (a partnership between Nuffield Trust and The Health Foundation)

Link to main document

Publication format: PDF

Date of publication: April 2016

Summary of driver

This research looks at whether the quality of public health services, and public health outcomes, have changed over the last few years, particularly in the light of the move to local authority provision of public health since the 2012 Health and Social Care Act.

20 public health indicators are examined, along with reflections from senior public health staff. Six indicators showed deterioration, while 10 showed improvements although in five of those, progress may have slowed.

It was felt that there were opportunities for integration across local authority services to improve services, for example working with leisure services to encourage participation in sport. However, there was also some fragmentation, and loss of referral routes in some areas.

Continued funding cuts are still a concern, despite prevention and public health being a key part of the Five Year Forward View.

Key features of driver

Both quantitative and qualitative research approaches are used to provide an independent overview of public health quality and outcome. However, the short period of time since public health moved into local authorities in 2013 means it may not be long enough for funding and organisational changes to have had their full impact.

Primary audience

Public health staff, commissioners, Health and Wellbeing boards

Impact on library policy/practice

One of the main opportunities identified in the report was greater integration across local authority functions in support of public health goals. This may lead to a discussion about what constitutes the public health workforce, and whether library services that are commissioned to provide a service to public health may need to extend their offering to the ‘wider’ public health workforce, for example housing professionals, trading standards, and leisure centre staff, as these and many other employees can have an impact on public health outcomes.

Whilst an embedded librarian role, such as that used in Warrington (where there is a dedicated  Public Health & Commissioning Librarian) is an ideal, funding cuts to public health of 3.9% per year over the next five years as proposed in the 2015 spending review make this more difficult for local authorities to fund, and hence for library services to provide.

However, with prevention and public health being a key part of the Five Year Forward View, library services may decide, justifiably, to push to raise their visibility among public health staff, and try provide a range of key services to them (for example, literature searching and current awareness, as identified in the Warrington case study) even where funding for library services from local authorities does not follow. The Sustainability and Transformation Plans that are due to be published in 2016 may also provide a further driver for this. However, care needs to be taken that this does not disadvantage organisations that continue to pay for library services, or provide a disincentive to fund them.

Date last updated: July 2016

Due for review: July 2017

Group member responsible: JC

Listening into Action (LiA) Library Support

Project team: Joanne Shawcross; Tracey Roberts Cuffin; Paul Tickner; Janet Reed

Resources required:

  • Time to attend the Big Conversations, including travel.
  • Clinical Librarian time to undertake literature searches.
  • Access to relevant resources including HDAS and Emerald Management Collection

Timeframe:

September 2015 – April 2016 for initial project, however this will become business as usual for the library.

“The story”

UHMB Trust adopted the Listening into Action (LiA) approach to encourage and implement improvement within the organisation. The aim is to engage and empower staff to suggest and make changes that will improve services and also the experience of staff.

The scheme was launched in the Trust in September 2014. Each LiA scheme has a 20 week timeframe staring with a “Big Conversation” (BC) where all interested parties get together with a scheme sponsor. Several schemes run together in waves and at the end of each wave a “pass it on” event is held to share the achievements and lessons learned.

The library started to receive literature search requests linking to some of the LiA schemes. Without a full understanding of the area/subject being looked at it was sometimes difficult to provide comprehensive results. It was decided that if a library team member could attend all the BCs a fuller understanding of the scheme cold be gained and any questions could be asked there and then.

From September 2015 a librarian has attended the BCs whenever possible. A full picture of the scheme is gained and any areas when a literature search would be beneficial are noted. The librarian joins in the discussions and also suggests where providing evidence may help with the process.

After the event a full literature search is undertaken by a clinical librarian and provided to the LiA team and the scheme sponsor to circulate to others involved.
The library team attend the pass it on events at the end of each wave of schemes. At these events support from the library has been acknowledged in several of the scheme presentations.

Alignment to local, regional and national drivers:

Local: CQC Improvement Plan; UHMBT Quality Improvement Strategy 2016-19; Better Care Together; UHMBT Strategic Plan; Library and Knowledge Service Strategic Plan

National: NHS Efficiency; Listening into Action; Knowledge for healthcare: a development framework for NHS library and knowledge services in England 2015-2020

Impact for the organisation/customer:

The library is providing the evidence base for decision making to support change and improvement and is a key part of the improvement pathway.

Impact for the library:

This project has raised the profile of the library by reaching out to a wider user base. The library team are better known throughout the organisation and are being contacted to support staff in other areas.

Over the 9 month period a total of 23 searches taking 58.5 hours were carried out and attendance at meetings took up 28 hours of staff time.

Lessons learned :

Librarian involvement from the outset enables the clinical librarians to provide a more relevant, appropriate literature search package.

Sustainability / next steps?

The library team need to keep in touch with the LiA management team to ensure continuing involvement in the schemes from the outset.

As we increase involvement the workload will increase and therefore it is important to ensure that the library team have the capacity for the extra work involved.

Contact details: Joanne.shawcross@mbht.nhs.uk
Date case study completed: 10th May 2016

MAP Toolkit as a community of practice

MAP Toolkit began as a small group of like-minded librarians in the UK, who, through mutual enthusiasm and a desire to collaborate, created an online resource to enable health libraries to demonstrate value and impact. As we developed the toolkit, we shared learning, expertise, ideas and knowledge.  Working collaboratively on the project has not only created a resource for other librarians, but has cultivated a community of practice for those of us developing the project.

A community of practice is defined as ‘a group of people who share a concern or passion for something they do and learn how to do it better as they interact regularly’ (Wenger, 1998).  For the MAP Toolkit project team, the learning that we’ve experienced as professionals has been unexpected and unintentional; a bi-product of working together in pursuit of a shared goal.

After struggling for a few years as a small, regional group, the project team expanded in 2013 and invited involvement from other librarians across the country.  Ten ‘Content Editors’ were recruited who brought with them additional expertise and differing perspectives.  Since then, the group has only met once face-to-face, with the majority of communication taking place via email discussion list and teleconference.  Often our teleconferences digress into discussions about other issues currently facing health libraries in the UK today, which really benefits our understanding of the challenges that library staff face in demonstrating value and impact.

Personally, I’ve developed professionally in many ways since working on the project.  I’ve broadened my understanding of strategic drivers in the NHS, which as a relatively new library manager has been invaluable to my development.  I’ve incorporated elements of the project planning template into my local promotional activities, so that they are aligned with local and national drivers.  I’ve used the case study template to write articles and case studies that we’ve used locally to demonstrate our impact on the wider organisation.  My team have written case studies for the toolkit and contributed to the KM Stories section of the site.  Being part of this project has been really exciting.  Working alongside librarians from across the UK is a brilliant experience and it really does feel like we’re part of something cutting edge in libraries.  As a whole, my involvement in the project has contributed to my own development, as well as that of my team, and has led directly to improvements in the service that we deliver locally.

We are currently looking for additional Content Editors who feel that they have a couple of hours a month to spare to work on this national project.  If you’re a health librarian in the UK who’s interested in joining our small but perfectly formed project team, please get in touch!