Tag Archives: Patient-centred care

Raising the Bar. Shape of Caring:

Title of driver: Raising the Bar. Shape of Caring: A Review of the Future Education and Training of Registered Nurses and Care Assistants

Source:  Link to main document:

Publication format:  PDF

Date of publication: March 2015

Summary of driver:

A review chaired by Lord Willis on the current education and training for care staff and registered nurses which recognises the importance of providing the correct education and training for registered nurses and care assistants.

The review states that the health system cannot continue in its present state. Registered nurses and care assistants are the largest workforce group and need to be part of the radical solution in which healthcare changes from an illness-based, provider-led system to a patient-led, preventative model.

Registered nurses and care assistants will play a more enhanced role in the community and helping patients with both preventative care and self-care and will need the skills to deliver this change in working practice.

The recommendations in the review have been based on the need to celebrate and promote existing good practice and to generate a research culture. The majority of the recommendations are aimed at HEE.

This review references HEE’s National Strategic framework 15, HEE Talent for Care Strategy, HEE Research and Innovation Strategy and other HEE documentation as well as the NHS England ‘Five Year Forward View’.

Key features of driver:

The following eight themes are discussed:

  • Valuing the care assistant role
  • Widening access for care assistants who wish to enter nursing
  • Developing a flexible model
  • Assuring a high-quality learning environment for registered nurses
  • Assuring high-quality, on-going learning for registered nurses
  • Assuring sustainable research and innovation
  • Assuring high quality funding and commissioning

Each theme has a set of recommendations and examples of good practice in relation to the theme.

Primary audience: HEE, NMC, LETBs, NHS England, Higher Education Institutes, NHS Trusts, NHS staff.

Impact on library policy/practice:

This driver links to library policy and practice by offering opportunities to promote information skills training to the staff groups involved. This would support staff in maintaining the portfolio skills passport and the Care Certificate.

There are opportunities to link into the lifelong learning and information literacy aspects of the report and promote the services that we already deliver. Using the technology available, we could consider delivering some services such as training in a different way to help those users in the community.

Other ways that this driver impacts on library policy and practice include:

  • Critical appraisal training
  • Journal clubs
  • ‘Training the trainer’ events- to help those staff who are teaching patients how to use technology to get the best evidence available, in order to allow them to self-care
  • Sessions on new technologies and how to use them- e.g. apps. E-learning platforms/remote access issues
  • RSS/Journal ToC’s etc. for the latest research to provide better patient care
  • Opportunity to strengthen links with Research and Development department

Specific quotes that can be mapped back to LKS.

Page 26, on information literacy  ‘nurses and care assistants must receive appropriate training to ensure that they and their patients can access the best evidence and information available, in order to underpin their practice through the use of up-to-date prescribing practice, technology and treatment interventions, enabling excellent self-care and professional care’.

Page 57, when talking about a flexible workforce the report mentions ‘broad research awareness and the ability to engage in critical inquiry and adopt ‘curiosity’

Page 61, on education programmes and employers are asked to ‘encourage employers to support care assistants and registered nurses to remain within their employment by providing them with opportunities to advance their careers and to engage in life-long learning’.

Date last updated: July 2015

Due for review:  July 2016

Group member responsible: LK

 

A Framework for Personalised Care and Population Health for Nurses, Midwives, Health Visitors and Allied Health Professionals

Source: Public Health England and Department of Health

Link to main document

Publication format: PDF

Date of publication: 4th July 2014

Summary of driver: The framework forms parts of the public health contribution of nurses and midwives: guidance. It has been developed with practitioners and leaders as a resource to support nurses, midwives, health visitors and allied health professionals’ in the delivery of their public health role. The framework will facilitate their access to the best evidence and is a tool to support practice on a number of levels. It can also assist clinical leaders, managers and commissioners to develop services which use the knowledge and skills of healthcare practitioners to deliver the best health outcomes for the populations they serve. This document recognises that at this point in time, health promoting practice is essential to meet the health challenges in society and is related the Public Health Outcomes Framework and the Compassion in Practice.

Key features of driver:

  • Six key areas of population health activity are listed; Improving the wider determinants of health, health improvement- making every contact help, health protection, healthcare public health, supporting health wellbeing and independence and Lifecourse.
  • Each section has an ‘aim’ which is linked to the relevant indicators in the Public Health Outcomes Framework (http://www.phoutcomes.info/) which can be used to measure impact/outcomes in that particular activity area.
  • Framework will support practice on a number of levels and provide staff with a tool that will help support them in the delivery of the population elements of their role. All staff will gain something from this framework ranging from using the framework to develop services for the local healthcare population to using it to develop local commissioning.
  • Framework supports and shapes health promoting practice and embeds personalised care across all ages and communities
  • Public Health Intervention Wheel (adapted from the Minnesota Department of Health in 2001) demonstrates the use of public health practice at three levels- individual, community and population. It defines the scope of public health nursing practice by the type of intervention.

Primary audience: Nurses, midwives, health visitors and allied health professionals, professional managers (local and regional)/commissioners/researchers and those in other education based roles.

Impact on library policy/practice:

  • Opportunity to ensure that healthcare staff have the relevant up to date evidence via methods such as current awareness bulletins and targeted information delivery (Kings Fund/WHO).
  • Opportunity to develop new outreach links and services to staff in the community.
  • Ensuring that access to the documents/links mentioned is available and signposting access. The framework is an interactive document so users should be able to access the information at the point of need. LKS staff can ensure that access to the links and documents is available.

Date last updated: July 2014
Due for review: July 2015
Group member responsible: LK

NHS White Paper “Equity and Excellence: Liberating the NHS”

Title of driver: “Equity and excellence: liberating the NHS” White Paper

Source: Department of Health

Link to main document

The Department of Health Business Plan 2013-2015 (July 2013) outlines the structural reform priorities of the coalition government:

1. Create a patient-led NHS
2. Promote better healthcare outcomes
3. Revolutionise NHS accountability
4. Promote public health
5. Reform social care

Publication format: PDF

Date of publication: 12th July 2010

Summary of driver:
The NHS White Paper sets out the Government’s long-term vision for the future of the NHS. The vision builds on the core values and principles of the NHS – a comprehensive service, available to all, free at the point of use, based on need, not ability to pay. It sets out how we will: put patients at the heart of everything the NHS does; focus on continuously improving those things that really matter to patients – the outcome of their healthcare; and empower and liberate clinicians to innovate, with the freedom to focus on improving healthcare services.

Key features extracted from the Executive Summary:

  • Putting patients and public first: We will put patients at the heart of the NHS, through an information revolution and greater choice and control
  • Improving healthcare outcomes: To achieve our ambition for world-class healthcare outcomes, the service must be focused on outcomes and the quality standards that deliver them. The Government’s objectives are to reduce mortality and morbidity, increase safety, and improve patient experience and outcomes for all.
  • Autonomy, accountability and democratic legitimacy: The Government’s reforms will empower professionals and providers, giving them more autonomy and, in return, making them more accountable for the results they achieve, accountable to patients through choice and accountable to the public at local level (GP Commissioning)
  • Cutting bureaucracy and improving efficiency: The NHS will need to achieve unprecedented efficiency gains, with savings reinvested in front-line services, to meet the current financial challenge and the future costs of demographic and technological change . (Removal of PCTs and SHAs)

Primary audience: Everyone working in the NHS

Impact on library policy/practice: The White Paper provides a challenge to Libraries and librarians, as the changes in structure (e.g. removal of PCT/SHA and introduction of new stakeholder groups CCGs/CSUs) have a continuing impact on the way services are delivered.

Some ideas about how the driver could be linked to library services are summarised below:

  • Focus on ‘information’ and ‘evidence’ Link here for discussion Lansley leads information revolution
  • The White Paper mentions ‘evidence’ on the following pages 4, 8, 11, 13, 14, 16, 18, 21, 22, 23, 30, 31, 49 and 55.
  • “Information, combined with the right support, is the key to better care, better outcomes and reduced costs.” Equity and Excellence: Liberating the NHS. Department of Health, July 2010. 2.5 p.13.
  • The white paper highlights the need for patient care quality standards to be based on the ‘best available evidence’ (p.23).

Case studies / Local service profile examples mapping to this driver: None @ 4.10.2013

Date last updated: 4.10.2013

Due for review: April 2014

Group member responsible: TP